Ridgewood Concert Band 2013 - 2014 Season

Featured Soloists
Alan Baer, Principal Tuba New York Philharmonic
Donald Batchelder, Principal Trumpet New York City Opera
Mary Kay Messenger, Soprano
John Palatucci, Euphonium
Richard Summers, Clarinet
Kenneth Tse, Saxophone
Lois Hicks-Wozniak , Saxophone
Winner of the 2013 - 2014 Youth Soloist Competition

Guest Conducting Appearances
Edward Lisk
Col. Bryan Shelburne, Director US Army Band, Pershing’s Own, Retired

Sixth Annual Side By Side Concert
Top area high school musicians join the Ridgewood Concert Band for our Season Finale
Salute To Our Nation's Veterans
Friday, October 25, 2013
8:00 PM
West Side Presbyterian Church
Ridgewood, New Jersey
Featured Guest Soloists
Donald Batchelder
Principal Trumpet, New York City Opera
John Palatucci, Euphonium
Mary Kay Messenger, Soprano
Guest Conducting Appearance
Col. Bryan Shelburne, Director US Army Band, Pershing's Own, Retired
Prelude Performance
New Jersey City University Wind Symphony, Patrick Burns, Conductor
Program Highlights
When Speaks the Signal - Trumpet Tone - David Gillingham
Learn more   ►

When Speaks the Signal-Trumpet Tone – David R. Gillingham (b. 1947). The three movements or sections of When Speaks the Signal-Trumpet Tone are continuous without pause. The first movement "When stride the warriors of the storm" is suggestive of the homesickness of the G.I. alone on the foreign battlefield. The second movement "By angel hands to valor given," is designed to evoke the image of a funeral procession to a military cemetery for the burial of a fallen comrade. The final movement, "Shall thy proud stars resplendent shine" should evoke feelings of joy, victory and patriotism. The composer’s message is skillfully presented by tonight’s soloist.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Cousins - Herbert L. Clarke Learn more   ►

Cousins – Herbert L. Clarke (1867-1957) was composed in 1904 as a cornet and trombone duet with band accompaniment for the composer himself on cornet and Leo Zimmerman as the trombone soloist. Both soloists at that time were principal players with John Philip Sousa’s renowned touring band. Herbert L. Clarke was acknowledged to be the greatest cornet soloist of his time and was certainly the most celebrated. Cousins combined the requisite technical displays of the time with an increased warmth and lyricism of style, focusing on melodic flow even in extremely difficult passages. The work is as impressive today as it was at the turn of the last century.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Overture to "Katherine" - John Philip Sousa Learn more   ►

Overture to "Katherine" – John Philip Sousa (1854 – 1932) was Sousa's earliest stage work composed but never performed in 1879 when he was only 25 years old. It was in this same year that Sousa was chosen as Director of the U.S. Marine Band in Washington, D.C. that was the beginning of his fabled 52 year career as a bandmaster. This early comic opera fell into obscurity once the more mature Sousa offered his crown jewel and often performed "El Capitan" in 1896. However, the Overture to “Katherine” has been revived and published recently so audiences can appreciate an early work of one of America's most prolific and beloved composers

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

To Tame the Perilous Skies - David Holsinger Learn more   ►

To Tame The Perilous Skies – David R. Holsinger (b. 1945) was conceived as a programmatic work literally depicting two opposing forces colliding in battle. Commissioned by the 564th Tactical Air Command Band, Langley AFB, Virginia, this musical composition received its premiere performance under the baton of Lt. Col. Lowell Graham in the fall of 1990. At the time of its premiere, United Nations forces were assembling in the Persian Gulf, and only a few months later the world watched as modern technological air power "tamed the perilous skies" over Iraq and Kuwait. In retrospect, this work is dedicated not only to the exceptional men and women of the Tactical Air Command, but to the spirit of the modern military aviator, taming perilous skies that all men might live free of oppression.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Overture "1812" - P.I.Tchaikowsky Learn more   ►

Overture "1812" – P.I. Tchaikowsky (1840-1893) was commissioned in 1880 by Nikolai Rubinstein for the Moscow Exhibition of 1881. The newly-constructed Cathedral of Christ the Savior was scheduled to be opened in commemoration of the historical events of 1812, the year that Napoleon invaded Russia. After Moscow burned, he ordered French troops to retreat, but winter set in early. Casualties in the French Grand Army were catastrophic. Napoleon’s forces were effectively wiped out, forcing him to return to France to raise a new army. Given the historical observance and the occasion of the cathedral opening, Tchaikovsky combined French and Russian anthems with Russian Orthodox chant and a healthy dose of military bombast. The result was one of the most popular and often performed overtures ever composed

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Festival Overture on the American National Air - Dudley Buck Learn more   ►

Festival Overture on the American National Air – Dudley Buck (1839 – 1909) was initially performed in Indianapolis in 1887 for the Music Teachers' National Association annual meeting. Buck loved to employ counterpoint (the art of combining different melodic lines) in his compositions. Buck's delicious musical work bursts on the scene with a bright theme that pushes confidently ahead. Interestingly, the "Star-Spangled Banner" comes in as the second theme, and works just beautifully with the beginning music, as they both continue in counterpoint. There is more symphonic development until the "Star-Spangled Banner" appears again in the relative minor key. A development section then leads us to a repeat of the counterpoint and the full anthem, expertly orchestrated, which continues until the end with a driving rhythmic force. The RCB is delighted to present this patriotic gem once again.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Taps - Eternal Father - Daniel Butterfield and John B. Dykes Learn more   ►

Taps - Eternal Father – Daniel Butterfield (1831-1901) and John B. Dykes (1823-1806) Arranged by Capt. Kenneth R. Force, USMS. The familiar melody of Taps is credited to Union General Daniel Butterfield during the Civil War. The melody was made the official Army bugle call after the war, but was not given the name "Taps" until 1874. The first time "Taps" was played at a military funeral may have been in Virginia, soon after Butterfield composed it. This has become a tradition that continues at military funerals in the present day. Eternal Father Strong to Save is known to United States Navy men and women as the “Navy Hymn”. It is a musical benediction that has had a long and special appeal to seafaring men and women. This arrangement of these two moving melodies places a lone bugler away from the band. The two echo each other back and forth, finally fading away into the night, just as Taps does each evening at sundown. This reverent music is an emotional ride.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Stars and Stripes - John Philip Sousa Learn more   ►

The Stars and Stripes Forever – John Philip Sousa (1854-1932) is considered the finest march ever written, and one of the most patriotic ever conceived. The march was not so well received at first, yet its popularity grew as Sousa used it during the Spanish-American War as a concert closer. Audiences would rise from their chairs when the march was played. Sousa added to the entertainment value of the march by having the piccolo up in front of the band for the final trio, and then added the brass section to join on the final repeat of the strain. The march was performed on almost all of Sousa's concerts and always drew an emotional response from the audience. In 1987 President Ronald Reagan signed a bill into law that designated the Stars and Stripes as the official march of the United States of America. This march continues in the present day to stir patriotic emotion from audiences both home and abroad.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Winter Festival
Friday, December 6, 2013
8:00 PM
West Side Presbyterian Church
Ridgewood, New Jersey
Guest Conducting Appearance
Edward Lisk
Prelude Performance
Ramapo High School Wind Ensemble
Jacqueline Sarracco, Director
Program Highlights
Prelude and Fugue in C minor - J.S. Bach arr. Tim Topelowski
Learn more   ►

The foundation of J.S. Bach's legacy is in his establishment of a harmonic and melodic style that is still being taught in colleges and universities. By giving each line its own beauty through the interaction of melody, harmony, and rhythm, he transforms a simple melody into a majestic sonority of great passion and imagery. The Fantasia and Fugue was composed during his employment as organist and member of the court orchestra in Weimar, Germany. Some estimates put the date of its composition at 1723. Elgar's orchestral transcription of the Fantasia and Fugue in C minor came about over a casual lunch with Richard Strauss in 1920. They agreed that Elgar would score the Fugue and that Strauss would score the Fantasia. Elgar completed the Fugue in April of 1921. Hearing nothing from Strauss regarding the Fantasia, Elgar completed its scoring in June of 1922. Writing to a friend and organist Elgar stated, "I have orchestrated a Bach fugue in a modern way... I wanted to show how gorgeous and great and brilliant he would have made himself sound if he had had our means." Arranger Timothy Topolewski's setting offers the wind band the opportunity to experience Bach and Elgar at their finest.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Danserye - Tilman Susato arr Patrick Dunnigan Learn more   ►

Selections from "The Danserye" by Tilman Susato and arranged by Patrick Dunnigan, is a new setting for wind band consisting of nine dances fashioned into an extended "symphonic suite." The arrangement utilizes the full resources of the modern wind band featuring various sections (or consorts of instruments) in alteration with powerful tutti passages. While the wind parts remain faithful to the original material, the dances are energized with a healthy dose of contemporary percussion effects and a significant part for acoustic guitar. This blend of sound generates a "new, but familiar element," thus making something very modern out of music that is more than 450 years old.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Puszta - Jan Van der Roost Learn more   ►

A versatile composer and arranger, Van der Roost is represented by works for wind band, brass quintet, orchestra, choir, chamber ensemble, piano, and guitar. His compositions have been performed on radio and television and recorded in over 35 countries. This suite of four gypsy dances was written in 1987. While having the definitive sound of authentic folk dances, the themes and melodies are all original. The dances alternate from bright and colorful to tranquil and melancholic, moods typical of gypsy music. Lying to the south and east of the Danube, the Puszta is the great Hungarian plain or prairie country that was home to nomadic shepherds and fierce horsemen. The region is noted as the original home of the celebrated Lipizzaner stallions.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Onward – Upward March - E. F. Goldman Learn more   ►

Onward-Upward March was written in 1930 during a period when the composer was deeply involved in efforts to standardize concert band instrumentation. Only a few months earlier he had organized the American Bandmasters Association to raise wind bands and music to a higher standard of artistic excellence and to secure the adaptation of universal instrumentation so that band publications of all countries would be interchangeable. At the time, wind bands contained varying numbers of musicians and instruments and little music was composed specifically for band. The title of this composition reflects optimistic conviction that bands would evolve "onward" to a bright and flourishing future and standardized orchestration would enable "upward" progression of the genre.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Rest - Frank Ticheli Learn more   ►

Rest for Concert Band was created in 2010 as a concert band adaptation of the composer's work for chorus, "There Will Be Rest." In making this version, the composer wanted to preserve almost everything from the original including harmony, dynamics and even the original registration. He also endeavored to preserve carefully the fragile beauty and quiet dignity suggested by the words of the poet Sara Teasdale:

    
    There will be rest, and sure stars shining
    Over the roof-tops crowned with snow,
    A reign of rest, serene forgetting,
    The music of stillness holy and low.
    I will make this world of my devising,
    Out of a dream in my lonely mind,
    I shall find the crystal of peace, above me
    Stars I shall find.

    Sara Teasdale (1884-1933
                                        

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Noisy Wheels of Joy - Eric Whitacre Learn more   ►

Noisy Wheels of Joy is just pure, simple fun, written in the tradition of the great comic operatic overtures, and it was designed to provide any concert with musical merriment. The structure is quite formal, but the three themes (love, adventure, and buffo) get thrown around the wind symphony with wild abandon. Noisy Wheels of Joy was commissioned by the Band Composers Masterworks Consortium. It was premiered on March 8, 2001 at the ABA National Convention. Eric Whitacre is one of the most popular and performed composers of our generation. Mr.Whitacre studied at the UNLV and at The Juilliard School, where he earned a master of music degree and studied with John Corigliano, the famed Pulitzer Prize and Oscar-winning composer.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Touchstone - Stephen Melillo (b. 1957) Learn more   ►

The Touchstone meant as a prayer before battle, is one movement of a large multi movement work titled "David." Inspired by the biblical story, the composer's intent is to dedicate the larger work to the "Davids" of our world and to the memory of those who, despite untimely passing, have spent their lives for noble causes often considered small... or perhaps not noticed at all. These people are like "Touchstones" of legend, truly rare and precious… but their lives have not been in vain.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Sleigh Ride - Leroy Anderson (1908-1975) Learn more   ►

Sleigh Ride is a popular and very familiar light seasonal piece that has become one of America’s favorites. The composer had the original idea during a heat wave in July 1946 and finished the work in February 1948. The lyrics are about a person, who would like to ride with another in a sleigh on a winter's day, were written by Mitchell Parish in 1950. This popular piece is often performed on holiday programs, even though the lyrics never mention any holiday-related activities. Still, since the Boston Pops (conducted by Arthur Fiedler) first recorded the piece in 1949, it has become a holiday concert staple and an audience's delight.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Saxophone Spectacular
Friday, February 7, 2014
8:00 PM
West Side Presbyterian Church
Ridgewood, New Jersey
Featured Guest Soloists
Kenneth Tse, Saxophone
Lois Hicks-Wozniak, Saxophone
Prelude Performance
Paramus High School Wind Ensemble
Mark Donellan, Director
Program Highlights
Cuban Overture -George Gershwin
Learn more   ►

George Gershwin (1898-1937) is known for having the distinction of articulating in music a distinctly American sound world. Gershwin was unquestionably a master urban musical landscapist. A much-needed vacation to Havana in 1932 resulted in a rapturous encounter with Cuban music. Thus inspired, Gershwin bought a bunch of native percussion instruments and had them shipped stateside in anticipation of composing a work incorporating Cuban musical elements. The Cuban Overture demonstrates his increasing ability to marry traditional European techniques and formal patterns with the rhythms and spirit of Cuba as filtered through Gershwin's jazz-age experiences. A profusion of themes dots the musical landscape, running the gamut from exuberant vitality to slow-motion sensuality. The result is an authentic rhythmic thrill ride.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Prayer of St. Gregory, Symphony Number 4 - Alan Hovhaness Learn more   ►

Alan Hovhaness (1911-2000) was one of the most prolific 20th-century composers, with his official catalog comprising 67 numbered symphonies and 434 opus numbers. The Boston Globe music critic Richard Buell once wrote: "Although Hovhaness has been stereotyped as a self-consciously Armenian composer, his output assimilates the music of many cultures. What may be most American about all of it is the way it turns its materials into a kind of exoticism. The atmosphere is hushed, reverential, mystical, and nostalgic." The Prayer of St. Gregory was originally cast as an intermezzo in the composer's religious opera Etchmiadzin. Saint Gregory, the Illuminator brought Christianity to Armenia around the year 301 A.D. This music is likened to a prayer in darkness. History states that St. Gregory was cast into the pit of a dungeon where he miraculously survived after about fifteen years. In the setting of this work the solo trumpet functions as a cantor, or preacher, while the wind band responds as the congregation.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Duo Concertante - Engebretson Learn more   ►

Mark Engebretson (b.1964) The Duo Concertante for two alto saxophones is a one movement work that pits a soaring lyrical theme performed by one soloist against a driving rhythmic theme played by the other. The two soloists are then matched against the band. As the music progresses, elements of one theme can be heard to invade the other. The fun is in listening to see which idea ultimately emerges as the "winner." Among the special effects are tone color changes and quartertones. Tonight’s soloists will expertly demonstrate the high octane energy and over the top expressivity necessary to perform the challenge of the composition while a cadenza will give both soloists an opportunity to "strut their stuff."

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Forza Del Destino Overture - Giuseppe Verdi Learn more   ►

Giuseppe Verdi (1813-1901) was to Italian opera what Beethoven was to the symphony. He was considered a national treasure, serving as the successor to the great Italian opera composers Donizetti, Rossini, and Bellini. Verdi became the most influential opera composer of the 19th century, and during his lifetime also became the most monetarily successful. The transcription by R. Mark Rogers for concert band reflects the original symphonic setting. After six unison blasts from the brasses, the overture opens with a musical idea symbolizing the relentless force that carries forward the tragic events of the opera. Fate and destiny are the principle themes throughout the work. The final statement of the "fate" motive is accompanied with a delicate obligato in the upper woodwinds, and the entire piece is pulled together in a stirring finale.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Nobles of the Mystic Shrine - John Philip Sousa

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vestibulum venenatis vehicula rutrum. Praesent gravida metus id ligula dignissim, eget tempus magna convallis. Aenean ultricies elit sed diam interdum, sit amet ultrices felis tempus. Integer tristique nulla et neque varius, at vulputate justo fermentum. Fusce imperdiet non sem vitae blandit. Duis non ligula interdum, consectetur velit in, consectetur justo.

Soprano Sax Concerto - David Kirkland Garner

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vestibulum venenatis vehicula rutrum. Praesent gravida metus id ligula dignissim, eget tempus magna convallis. Aenean ultricies elit sed diam interdum, sit amet ultrices felis tempus. Integer tristique nulla et neque varius, at vulputate justo fermentum. Fusce imperdiet non sem vitae blandit. Duis non ligula interdum, consectetur velit in, consectetur justo.

Con-Tse-To, Concert for Alto Saxophone and Concert Band - Gregory Fritze

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vestibulum venenatis vehicula rutrum. Praesent gravida metus id ligula dignissim, eget tempus magna convallis. Aenean ultricies elit sed diam interdum, sit amet ultrices felis tempus. Integer tristique nulla et neque varius, at vulputate justo fermentum. Fusce imperdiet non sem vitae blandit. Duis non ligula interdum, consectetur velit in, consectetur justo.

March Winds
Friday, March 21, 2014
8:00 PM
West Side Presbyterian Church
Ridgewood, New Jersey
Featured Guest Soloist
Richard Summers, Clarinet
Prelude Performance
Wayne Hills High School Wind Ensemble
Christopher DeWilde, Director
Program Highlights
Concert Fantasia on Motives from Verdi’s Opera "Rigoletto" - Luigi Bassi arr. by LP Laurendeau
Learn more   ►

Luigi Bassi (1833-1871) was an Italian clarinetist and composer. Most of Bassi's solo works for clarinet were written in the opera fantasy genre, which was common in 19th century Italy. In this work Bassi presents melodies borrowed from Verdi's opera "Rigoletto." He offers variations on these melodies to showcase his own ingenuity and the performer’s virtuosity. Flourishing cadenzas and original compositional material create a varied emotional musical landscape for the listener. Very few of Luigi Bassi's works have remained in print, but the Concert Fantasia on Motives from Verdi’s "Rigoletto" has fortunately survived and continues to challenge only the most talented clarinetists.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Requiem - David Maslanka Learn more   ►

David Maslanka (b. 1943) received his undergraduate degree from Oberlin College Conservatory of Music, and his MM and Ph.D. from Michigan State University. After serving on several music faculties, he has been a freelance composer since 1990. Mr. Maslanka has composed in many genres including symphonies, concertos, choral works and a complete Mass, but he is best known for his wind ensemble and band music. He has received grants from several prestigious organizations, including ASCAP and the National Symphony Orchestra, and has served as a guest composer for more than 100 universities, music festivals and conferences. Mr. Maslanka’s compositional style is rhythmically intense and extremely complex yet possesses an underlying delicate beauty. He works from a meditative standpoint of spiritual inspiration, and this gentle, warm quality permeates his music as he has stated that "music is one of the expressions of soul." The Requiem as one of his latest additions upholds the composer's standard.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Selections from "The Pirates of the Penzance" - Arthur Sullivan, arr J.P. Sousa Learn more   ►

The Pirates of Penzance had its official premiere performance in New York City in 1979. This was the only premiere of a Gilbert and Sullivan operetta to be held outside of London. It was the fifth collaboration of the famous British pair and was immediately well received by both audiences and critics alike on both sides of the Atlantic. To this day it remains among the most popular operettas along with H.M.S. Pinafore and The Mikado. The famous John Philip Sousa, who himself was no stranger to operetta as a musical genre, was tremendously enamored with the works of Gilbert and Sullivan. He set a score of selections from the operetta the following year after its premiere and had his bands perform his arrangement often as they toured around the country. The musical marriage of Sullivan and Sousa that resulted in this arrangement afforded people the opportunity to hear and experience the vivacious toe tapping melodies the world has come to recognize so well.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Hail to the Spirit of Liberty - John Philip Sousa Learn more   ►

Although not among the composer's most popular works, this piece was originally written in 1923 as part of a suite named "Leaves From My Notebook." Sousa dedicated the suite to The Campfire Girls of America who were often present at concerts to shower Sousa with gifts and honors as he toured the country with his band. The suite consisted of three very feminine musical sketches. The last called The Lively Flapper vividly portrays all of the flash, speed and non-stop energy of the famed "flappers" of the roaring twenties.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Variations on a Neapolitan Theme "Cicerenella" - Steven Rosenhaus Learn more   ►

Steven L. Rosenhaus (b.1952) is a composer, lyricist, arranger, conductor, author, educator, and performer. His concert music has been called "clever, deftly constructed and likable"by The New York Times. Dr. Rosenhaus holds a Ph.D. from New York University where he serves as Adjunct Assistant Professor of Composition. He also holds M.A. and B.A. degrees from Queens College (CUNY). He has over 150 original works and arrangements in print. Variations on a Neapolitan Theme was commissioned by and is dedicated to the Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe Band, LCDR Kenneth Collins. The basis of the variations is Cicerenella, a well-known tarantella that is a traditional dance in 6/8 time originating from Naples, Italy. The structure of Variations on a Neapolitan Theme is straightforward. An introduction is followed by the tune in its original minor tonality, presented in a relatively unadorned fashion. Seven variations are presented next, followed by an extended coda. The coda recalls the introductory material as well as a full-out rendition of the original tune.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Jericho - Morton Gould Learn more   ►

Morton Gould (1913-1996) was born in New York and soon recognized as a child prodigy with the ability to improvise and compose. He began to play the piano when he was four years old, and his first composition was published two years later. He studied at the Institute of Musical Art (now the Juilliard School). By the age of 21 he was conducting and arranging a series of orchestral programs for WOR Mutual Radio, which appealed to a wide-ranging audience with its combination of classical and popular music. Gould composed over 1,000 works for Broadway, film, television and ballet. He integrated jazz, blues, and gospel, country-western and folk elements into his compositions. In Jericho, Gould uses jazz rhythms and modern chords, antiphonal trumpets and heavy percussion to dramatize the biblical story of Joshua blowing down the walls of Jericho.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Oscillation - Sean O'Laughlin

Morton Gould (1913-1996) was born in New York and soon recognized as a child prodigy with the ability to improvise and compose. He began to play the piano when he was four years old, and his first composition was published two years later. He studied at the Institute of Musical Art (now the Juilliard School). By the age of 21 he was conducting and arranging a series of orchestral programs for WOR Mutual Radio, which appealed to a wide-ranging audience with its combination of classical and popular music. Gould composed over 1,000 works for Broadway, film, television and ballet. He integrated jazz, blues, and gospel, country-western and folk elements into his compositions. In Jericho, Gould uses jazz rhythms and modern chords, antiphonal trumpets and heavy percussion to dramatize the biblical story of Joshua blowing down the walls of Jericho.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Powhatan's Daughter March - John Philip Sousa

Morton Gould (1913-1996) was born in New York and soon recognized as a child prodigy with the ability to improvise and compose. He began to play the piano when he was four years old, and his first composition was published two years later. He studied at the Institute of Musical Art (now the Juilliard School). By the age of 21 he was conducting and arranging a series of orchestral programs for WOR Mutual Radio, which appealed to a wide-ranging audience with its combination of classical and popular music. Gould composed over 1,000 works for Broadway, film, television and ballet. He integrated jazz, blues, and gospel, country-western and folk elements into his compositions. In Jericho, Gould uses jazz rhythms and modern chords, antiphonal trumpets and heavy percussion to dramatize the biblical story of Joshua blowing down the walls of Jericho.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Celebrate New Jersey
Friday, May 9, 2014
8:00 PM
West Side Presbyterian Church
Ridgewood, New Jersey
Featured Guest Soloists
Alan Baer, Principal Tuba New York Philharmonic
Emmett Rapaport - Saxophone
Winner of the 2013 - 2014 Youth Soloist Competition
Also presenting the Sixth Annual Side-by-Side Concert
with the finest High School musicians from the area
Prelude Performance
Midland Park High School Concert Band
David Marks, Director
Alan Baer
Program Highlights
On the Jersey Shore - Arthur Pryor

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vestibulum venenatis vehicula rutrum. Praesent gravida metus id ligula dignissim, eget tempus magna convallis. Aenean ultricies elit sed diam interdum, sit amet ultrices felis tempus. Integer tristique nulla et neque varius, at vulputate justo fermentum. Fusce imperdiet non sem vitae blandit. Duis non ligula interdum, consectetur velit in, consectetur justo.

Congress Hall March - John Philip Sousa Learn more   ►

Congress Hall is the name of a historic hotel in Cape May, New Jersey, a popular summer resort area. Sousa was so impressed by Cape May City and Congress Hall that he wrote a song named after the hotel and his band played it on the lawn of the prestigious resort. Of all the bands and orchestras that came to Cape May since the early 19th century, the one that outshone the others in international fame and popularity was the renowned Marine Band conducted by John Philip Sousa. The military marches were played with such distinctive verve and enthusiasm that it caused Sousa himself to say "A march should make a man with a wooden leg step out." Whether there were any wooden legs in the audience when Sousa performed on the lawn of Congress Hall during the summer of 1882, is not known. But there were many people with healthy legs who stood and cheered and stepped out when they were inspired by the Sousa music.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

It Takes a Long Time to Grow Up in New Jersey - William Vollinger

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vestibulum venenatis vehicula rutrum. Praesent gravida metus id ligula dignissim, eget tempus magna convallis. Aenean ultricies elit sed diam interdum, sit amet ultrices felis tempus. Integer tristique nulla et neque varius, at vulputate justo fermentum. Fusce imperdiet non sem vitae blandit. Duis non ligula interdum, consectetur velit in, consectetur justo.

The Lively Flapper - John Philip Sousa Learn more   ►

Although not among the composer's most popular works, this piece was originally written in 1923 as part of a suite named "Leaves from My Notebook." Sousa dedicated the suite to The Campfire Girls of America who were often present at concerts to shower Sousa with gifts and honors as he toured the country with his band. The suite consisted of three very feminine musical sketches. The last called The Lively Flapper vividly portrays all of the flash, speed and non-stop energy of the famed "flappers" of the roaring twenties.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

The Liberty Bell - John Philip Sousa Learn more   ►

John Philip Sousa was inspired in 1893 while watching his son march in a parade celebrating the return of the Liberty Bell back to Philadelphia following a tour across the country. Sousa knew that a march honoring that great icon of freedom would serve not only as a celebration of the bell itself, but also the ideals it represents. The march is in typical Sousa style, full of bouncy rhythms, brilliant in its orchestration, both melodic and stirring. It is one of his finest and popular marches, bringing attention to the Liberty Bell itself through the use of chimes during the trio.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Concerto for Tuba and Wind Ensemble - Gary D. Ziek (b. 1960) Learn more   ►

Gary D. Ziek wrote this concerto for Alan Baer in January of 2011 for Mr. Baer's appearance with the Emporia State University Wind Ensemble. The work is in three movements, each reflecting different facets of the tuba as a solo instrument. The first movement titled Soaring, starts with a series of tuba fanfares, alternating with responses from the ensemble. The mood becomes increasingly agitated leading to the first full ensemble impact. There are moments when the tuba is heard soaring above the ensemble, with numerous lyrical episodes. The movement comes to a rousing conclusion with final statements of the melody being sounded in the woodwinds. The second movement titled Romance, begins with a gentle, flowing Siciliano. This leads to a waltz, which requires considerable lyricism and agility from the soloist. The Siciliano returns as the movement ends in a moment of quiet repose. This contemplative mood is abruptly shattered by the beginning of the 3rd movement titled Riot! Dissonant pyramids of sound set the stage for this final movement. Driving rhythms and furious, challenging tuba lines underscore the virtuosity of the artist throughout this movement. The soloist displays a short cadenza, leading to a lilting feel and coda, bringing the piece to a driving conclusion.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Selections from Disney/Pixar's "Up" - Michael Giacchino (b. 1967) Learn more   ►

Michael Giacchino was educated at Julliard in music and film production. His first major composition was for DreamWorks Studios for the video game adaptation of the 1997 movie "Jurassic Park, The Lost World". That was the first PlayStation and Sega Saturn video game to be recorded with an original live orchestral score. Giacchino has since continued his relationship with DreamWorks, providing full orchestral scores for many of their popular videogames. Since then he has gone on to work for Disney Pictures and Pixar Films, writing original soundtrack music for the 2004 computer-animated super hero film titled "The Incredibles". Continuing with Disney/Pixar, he wrote the soundtrack score for the 2009 computer-animated comedy-adventure film "Up", the story of an elderly widower and an earnest young wilderness explorer who fly to South America in an airborne house suspended by helium balloons. "Up" won Academy Awards for Best Animated Feature and for the Best Original Score (by Michael Giacchino). Musical selections from the movie heard here were arranged for concert band by Michael Brown

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

Show Boat (Selections for Concert Band) - Jerome Kern (1885-1945) and Oscar Hammerstein 2nd (1895-1960) Learn more   ►

Transcribed for Concert Band by Robert Russell Bennett (1894-1981) Before there was the musical Show Boat, musicals were reviews or comedies. Show Boat was the first true musical where songs, drama and story came together as a singular unit. It was in 1927 that the greatest revolution in the American musical theater arrived. Here was a completely new genre--the musical play as distinguished from musical comedy. Now, at long last, the play was the thing and everything else was subservient to that play. It was in this new production where theater goers could experience the complete integration of song, humor and production numbers into a single and inextricable artistic entity. Finally here was a musical with a consistent and credible story line, authentic atmosphere and three-dimensional characters. The artistic joining of Kern's lush score with the arranging talent of Robert Russell Bennett gave the American audience a Broadway musical that has endured and entertained for just short of a century.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.

The Whistler and His Dog - Arthur Pryor (1870-1942) Learn more   ►

Arthur Pryor was a virtuoso performer, conductor, composer, arranger, teacher and author, and continues to be a major influence in American musical life. He was an acclaimed solo trombonist and arranger in John Philip Sousa's band, a celebrated conductor and the composer of some of the most popular tunes of the early 1900s. Additionally, Pryor was a pioneering phonograph recording artist, an educator and a founding father of several major musical organizations. A household name for three decades, Pryor's Band was second in fame only to John Philip Sousa's. The Whistler and His Dog is decisively the composer's most popular work. Most listeners may not always recall the title but seldom forget the catchy melody. The familiar tune was used frequently as background music for many early motion pictures to provide a relaxed setting for the action. The composer was also known to engage the audience of his band concerts at the turn of the 20th Century with an invitation to whistle along with the piccolo.

Program notes compiled by Marcie Phelan.